2020 Roadtrip Blog ~ Montgomery County Indiana on March 20

(Keep scrolling! There are three sections.)

Montgomery County Indiana Courthouse

  • Montgomery County Indiana Courthouse

    Montgomery County Indiana Courthouse was built in 1876 ~ George Bunting was the architect ~ Crawfordsville is the Montgomery County Seat ~ Captured March 20, 2020

  • Montgomery County Indiana Courthouse

    Montgomery County Indiana Courthouse was built in 1876 ~ George Bunting was the architect ~ Crawfordsville is the Montgomery County Seat ~ Captured March 20, 2020

  • Montgomery County Indiana Courthouse

    Montgomery County Indiana Courthouse was built in 1876 ~ George Bunting was the architect ~ Crawfordsville is the Montgomery County Seat ~ Captured March 20, 2020

  • Montgomery County Indiana Courthouse

    Montgomery County Indiana Courthouse was built in 1876 ~ George Bunting was the architect ~ Crawfordsville is the Montgomery County Seat ~ Captured March 20, 2020

  • Montgomery County Indiana Courthouse

    Montgomery County Indiana Courthouse was built in 1876 ~ George Bunting was the architect ~ Crawfordsville is the Montgomery County Seat ~ Captured March 20, 2020




My visit

My first roadtrip of 2020 was to Crawfordsville, Indiana. I had several days off from work and felt the need for a roadtrip. No, I did not get within 6 feet of anyone to take any of these pictures! This is my first courthouse capture of 2020. You can click on any of the pics to go to the entire Indiana Courthouse gallery or click here.  I am attempting to photograph all of them!

Montgomery County Indiana Courthouse General info (from Wikipedia)

The third and current Montgomery County courthouse was the first courthouse designed by George W. Bunting of Indianapolis; it is one of six of his Indiana courthouses still standing. Bunting had served as a colonel in the Confederacy during the Civil War before establishing himself in Indianapolis; General Lew Wallace, who was on the Union side during the War and was a resident of Montgomery County, spoke at the dedication of the cornerstone in 1875. The building was constructed by McCormack and Sweeney of Columbus at a cost of $150,000, and was completed in 1876. The cornerstone contains an embedded copper box of memorable items, including the key to the old courthouse and a Henry VIII coin.

Wabash College in Crawfordsville Indiana




My visit

While in Crawfordsville, I decided to check out the Wabash College Campus. This is an all male college. I was thinking that the campus might be shut down due to the Pandemic, but there were still a few students walking around. The weather was miserable, so I didn't photograph all of the buildings. I just focused on the center of campus. You can click on any of the pics to go to the entire Wabash College gallery or click here.

Wabash College General info (from Wikipedia)

Wabash College is a private, men's liberal arts college in Crawfordsville, Indiana. Founded in 1832 by several Dartmouth College graduates and Midwestern leaders, it enrolls nearly 900 students. The college offers a undergraduate liberal arts curriculum in three academic divisions with 39 majors.

The college was initially named "The Wabash Teachers Seminary and Manual Labor College", a name shortened to its current form by 1851. Many of the founders were Presbyterian ministers, yet nevertheless believed that Wabash should be independent and non-sectarian. Patterning it after the liberal arts colleges of New England, they resolved "that the institution be at first a classical and English high school, rising into a college as soon as the wants of the country demand."

Caleb Mills, founder and first faculty member of the College Among these ministers was Caleb Mills, who became Wabash College's first faculty member. Dedicated to education in the then-primitive Mississippi Valley area, he would come to be known as the father of the Indiana public education system.

Elihu W. Baldwin, the first president of the college, served from 1835 until 1840. He came from a church in New York City and accepted the presidency even though he knew that Wabash was at that time threatened with bankruptcy. After his death, he was succeeded by Charles White, a graduate of Dartmouth College and the brother-in-law of Rev. Edmund Otis Hovey (1801–1877), a professor at the college. Joseph F. Tuttle, who became president of Wabash College in 1862 and served for 30 years, worked with his administrators to improve town-gown relations in Crawfordsville. Gronert described him "an eloquent preacher, a sound administrator and an astute handler of public relations." He is the namesake of Tuttle Grade School in Crawfordsville (1906) and Tuttle Junior High School, now Tuttle Middle School (1960). He was succeeded by Gregory D. Hess who became the 16th President of Wabash College July 1, 2013. Prior to coming to Wabash, Dr. Hess had been Dean of the Faculty and Vice President of Academic Affairs at Claremont McKenna College at Claremont, California.

During World War II, Wabash College was one of 131 colleges and universities offered students a path to a Navy commission as part of the V-12 Navy College Training Program. In the early 1900s, the college closed its "Preparatory School", which prepared incoming students from less-rigorous rural high schools that lacked the courses required for entrance to the College. In 1996, Wabash became the first college in America to stage Tony Kushner's Angels in America.



Montgomery County (and Parke County) Roadtrip Pics

  • Cox Ford Covered Bridge in Parke County Indiana

    Cox Ford Covered Bridge ~ Location: Parke County ~ Crosses: Sugar Creek ~ Carries: Cox Ford Road ~ Builder: J.A. Britton ~ Year Built: 1913 ~ Truss Type: Burr Arch ~ Dimensions: 1 Span, 176 Feet ~ Captured March 20, 2020

  • Cox Ford Covered Bridge in Parke County Indiana

    Cox Ford Covered Bridge ~ Location: Parke County ~ Crosses: Sugar Creek ~ Carries: Cox Ford Road ~ Builder: J.A. Britton ~ Year Built: 1913 ~ Truss Type: Burr Arch ~ Dimensions: 1 Span, 176 Feet ~ Captured March 20, 2020

  • Cox Ford Covered Bridge in Parke County Indiana

    Cox Ford Covered Bridge ~ Location: Parke County ~ Crosses: Sugar Creek ~ Carries: Cox Ford Road ~ Builder: J.A. Britton ~ Year Built: 1913 ~ Truss Type: Burr Arch ~ Dimensions: 1 Span, 176 Feet ~ Captured March 20, 2020

  • Darlington Covered Bridge in Montgomery County Indiana

    Darlington Covered Bridge ~ Location: Montgomery County ~ Crosses: Sugar Creek ~ Carries: CR-500N ~ Builder: Joseph Krees ~ Year Built: 1868 ~ Truss Type: Howe Truss ~ Dimensions: 2 Spans, 166 Feet ~ Captured March 20, 2020

  • Darlington Covered Bridge in Montgomery County Indiana

    Darlington Covered Bridge ~ Location: Montgomery County ~ Crosses: Sugar Creek ~ Carries: CR-500N ~ Builder: Joseph Krees ~ Year Built: 1868 ~ Truss Type: Howe Truss ~ Dimensions: 2 Spans, 166 Feet ~ Captured March 20, 2020

  • Darlington Covered Bridge in Montgomery County Indiana

    Darlington Covered Bridge ~ Location: Montgomery County ~ Crosses: Sugar Creek ~ Carries: CR-500N ~ Builder: Joseph Krees ~ Year Built: 1868 ~ Truss Type: Howe Truss ~ Dimensions: 2 Spans, 166 Feet ~ Captured March 20, 2020

  • Deer's Mill Covered Bridge in Montgomery County Indiana

    Deer's Mill Covered Bridge ~ Location: Montgomery County ~ Crosses: Sugar Creek ~ Carries: IN-234 ~ Builder: J.J. Daniels ~ Year Built: 1878 ~ Truss Type: Burr Arch ~ Dimensions: 2 Spans, 275 Feet ~ Captured March 20, 2020

  • Deer's Mill Covered Bridge in Montgomery County Indiana

    Deer's Mill Covered Bridge ~ Location: Montgomery County ~ Crosses: Sugar Creek ~ Carries: IN-234 ~ Builder: J.J. Daniels ~ Year Built: 1878 ~ Truss Type: Burr Arch ~ Dimensions: 2 Spans, 275 Feet ~ Captured March 20, 2020

  • Wilkins Mill Covered Bridge in Parke County Indiana

    Wilkins Mill Covered Bridge ~ Location: Parke County ~ Crosses: East Fork of the White River ~ Carries: Cox Ford Road ~ Builder: William Hendricks ~ Year Built: 1906 ~ Truss Type: Burr Arch ~ Dimensions: 1 Span, 102 Feet ~ Captured March 20, 2020




My visit

Montgomery County is home to two of Indiana's Covered Bridges, the Darlington Covered Bridge and the Deer's Mill Covered Bridge. On the way to Montgomery County, I drove through Parke County and photographed the Cox Ford Covered Bridge and the Wilkin's Mill Covered Bridge. 

There are many old buildings in Crawfordsville, and I had hopes of photographing most of them; however, the weather was crap, and I just didn't feel like hopping in and out of the truck that many times! The old barn was captured from the truck on the way to one of the bridges.

You can click on any of the Covered Bridge pics to see the entire Indiana Covered Bridge gallery or click here. You can click on any of the Churches to see the entire Indiana Church gallery or click here. To see the 2020 Indiana Roadtrip pics, click here.

Historic Structures General info(from Wikipedia)

The Cox Ford Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that crosses Sugar Creek along the western edge of Turkey Run State Park, in Parke County, in the U.S. state of Indiana. This single span Burr Arch truss structure has a length of 160 ft , or 176 ft including the 8 ft overhang at each end, with a portal clearance 16 ft wide by 13 ft in height. Built in 1913 by Joseph A. Britton, the Cox Ford Covered Bridge has a rather unusual distinction as it was built to replace a steel bridge lost in the 1913 flood; the arches used to construction this structure were from the Armiesburg Covered Bridge, built 60 years earlier and also washed out during the 1913 flood. During the Great Depression, the Cox Ford Covered Bridge received a new coat of paint that was applied by a Works Progress Administration group, and though no historical marker is present, the bridge was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. It is listed in the 1989 World Guide to Covered Bridges, published by The National Society for the Preservation of Covered Bridges, Inc., as #14-61-34; however, the designation used by Parke County officials is #14-61-36. In the February 1938 Indiana History Bulletin, Robert B. Yule and Richard C. Smith assigned the designation 'sg' to this Covered Timber Bridge located in Section 28, Township 17 North, and Range 7 West, about 1/2 a mile west of Turkey Run State Park.

Darlington Covered Bridge is a historic covered bridge located in Franklin Township, Montgomery County, Indiana. It was built in 1868, and is a single span, Howe truss covered bridge that spans Sugar Creek. It measures 166 feet long and has an overall width of 22 feet. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1990.

Deer's Mill is an unincorporated community in Ripley Township, Montgomery County, in the U.S. state of Indiana. The Deer's Mill Bridge was built in 1878 by J. J. Daniels and spans 275 feet across Sugar Creek. It was documented by the Historic American Engineering Record in 1974.

The Wilkins Mill Covered Bridge is north of Rockville, Indiana. The single span Burr Arch Truss covered bridge structure was built by William Hendricks in 1906. The bridge is 120 feet long, 16 feet wide, and 13 feet high. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. Solomon Jessup and Zimri Hunt built a mill in 1835 upstream from the bridge site. George Wilkins later opened a store there in 1853 and a carding mill, operated by Solomon Jessup and William Hunt was also built. In 1855 Wilkins bought the mill but later tore it down and built a new one. This is the source of the name Wilkins Mill, however, in 1877 this mill burned down and another mill was built which stood until 1947. The 1874 Atlas of Parke County shows that the creek was named Mill Creek, but today it is labeled as Sugar Mill Creek. Sugar Mill Creek and Green Creek converge below the bridge and it would seem that after one flood the Sugar Mill Creek changed its course and left the bridge standing over a dry creek bed for a period of time. Looking at satellite picture now show that it appears the bridge is once again crossing water. This was to be the second of three covered bridges built by William Hendricks.

Saint John's Episcopal Church is a historic Episcopal church located at Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Indiana. It was built in 1837 by an Episcopal congregation organized through missionary bishop Jackson Kemper, and is a one-story, gable fronted frame building in the Greek Revival style. The original section measures 30 feet by 50 feet; a 30-foot rear addition was built in 1960. Atop the roof is a belfry added about 1950. It is the oldest remaining church building in Crawfordsville and Indiana's first Episcopal Church building. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. Theologian Hans Frei, a longtime Yale Divinity School faculty member and a significant figure in Post-liberal theology, briefly served as rector in the early 1950s.

The Lane Place was the home of Sen. Henry S. Lane (1811- 1881) and Joanna Lane (1826-1914). It is located at 212 South Water Street in Crawfordsville, Indiana. Helen Elston Smith, the Lanes' niece, inherited the house after Joanna's death. She willed the house and its contents to the Montgomery County Historical Society on February 26, 1931. 85%-90% of all of the furnishings are either original to the house or belonged to the Elston Family. The house has been a museum since 1931 even though Helen continued to live in the home until the mid-1930s. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1981. It is located in the Elston Grove Historic District.